10 April 2011

A slip in time...

I've been messing about today with the next article for F&C...this time it's on drawer slips.
The approach I normally use is shown in the first pic is that of making a router groove which passes through the front tail (thus hiding it in the finished drawer.)

However, this leaves a narrow section (arrowed) that may present a weakness if the drawer is heavily loaded (one of SWIMBO's clothes drawers maybe...dunno) or one which may fail after many years. Drawer slips just add double the bearing area and do away with that thin, weak section.

The first thing is to prepare some oak 12mm thick and then make a 5x5mm groove down the length...it does help if one possesses a 'free and gratis' Veritas plough plane but any method will do as long as you end up with the groove.

Then you'll need to get hold of a very superior brass scratch stock (but an old wooden one will do at a pinch) and make a little bead down the length. Bandsaw off the slip, clean up the rough face and apply to the inside of the drawer...














And in the best traditions of Blue Peter...














...here's one I did earlier. You'll note, I hope, that no sticky backed plastic, loo rolls or other equally ghastly materials were used.

Just quarter sawn English Oak.

2 comments:

Paul Moldovanos said...

May I ask a question please? I understand the addition of a slip to prevent thinning out the drawer side. But is the bead with the scratch stock functional or for decoration only? Thanks. Paul

Woodbloke said...

Paul - the bead serves no practical purpose as the drawer slip would work just as well without it, but it's the traditional way of making one...and it means I can use a nice scratch stock!